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The Ordre des traducteurs, terminologues et interprètes agréés du Québec (OTTIAQ) is a professional order with a reserved title for its 2,200 members with recognized qualifications.

As part of its mandate to protect the public,

the Order strives to ensure and promote competency and professionalism among its member translators, terminologists and interpreters. To fulfill this role, the Order follows the mechanisms set out in the Professional Code and conducts inspections and entrance evaluations.

OTTIAQ has established itself in Quebec’s professional sphere

and has gained esteem from its status as a professional order. Moving forward, it aims to become a reference for translation, terminology and interpreting in Canada and abroad.

 

Professions

Translation

Profession profile

Translators transpose texts from one language to another, remaining true to the original meaning.

They generally translate from a second or third language into their native language.

Qualities of a translator

Translators are curious, capable of transferring meaning from one language to another, incredibly diligent and highly knowledgeable.

They must be very flexible and possess strong writing skills.

Working conditions

Roughly 60% of translators are salaried. These translators work for national and international organizations, private companies and translation firms. Private practice translators make up the remaining 40% of translators. The majority are generalists, but a significant proportion are experts in various fields.

 

Developments in technology have given rise to new tools that have vastly transformed working conditions for salaried and private practice translators alike.

Training

Translators receive training at university and build on this training throughout their careers by pursuing continuing education. This makes translation a perpetual challenge and daily source of enrichment.

 

Seven Quebec universities offer translation programs recognized by the Order.

Recognized programs

Certified translator: a reserved title

Only OTTIAQ members in good standing may practise under the title of certified translator in Quebec. Certified translators have qualifications recognized by the Order and are therefore professionals.

For more information on the responsibilities of OTTIAQ members, refer to the General public section.

Terminology

Profession profile

Terminologists catalogue terms specific to certain fields, analyze them, define them and find their equivalents in another language.

They also identify the terms used by companies and create databases, glossaries, dictionaries and lexicons to ensure consistency between publications.

Qualities of a terminologist

Terminologists have information technology skills, are attentive to detail and carry out thorough research. They are also be very intellectually curious and have a talent for summarization.

 

 

With their experience and professional relations with specialists, terminologists play an advisory role as part of project management in their specialty fields.

Working conditions

Just like translators, terminologists can be divided into two categories: salaried and private practice. As the restructuring of organizations and companies creates new needs, we are seeing more and more private practice terminologists.

 

The work of terminologists is extremely varied. They are required to work with copywriters, researchers and specialists and are often called upon to conduct quality control. They must be autonomous, well acquainted with resource materials and able to develop a network of contacts.

Training

Terminology is taught as part of translation programs in various Quebec universities. There are currently no university programs specialized in terminology alone.

Seven Quebec universities offer translation programs recognized by the Order that lead to the professional title of certified terminologist.

Certified terminologist: a reserved title

Only OTTIAQ members in good standing may practise under the title of certified terminologist in Quebec. Certified terminologists have qualifications recognized by the Order and are therefore professionals.

For more information on the responsibilities of OTTIAQ members, refer to the General public section.

Interpreting

Profession profile

Conference interpreters orally transpose messages from one language to another during speeches, meetings, conferences and debates, remaining true to the original meaning. In all circumstances, interpreters require conference-specific preparation, which varies depending on the field, in addition to general knowledge. There are two main types of conference interpreting: consecutive and simultaneous. The first type is used for communication in both directions, while the second is used for communication in one direction only.

Court interpreters are specialists in oral communication who interpret in courts of justice or administrative tribunals. They provide both consecutive and simultaneous interpreting. Consecutive interpreting, which is the most common type, is used when communication in both directions is needed, for example, during a cross-examination. Simultaneous interpreting is carried out using wireless electronic equipment and allows continuous, real-time transfer from one language to another. This method is used to establish communication in one direction only, for example, when it is necessary to interpret entire court proceedings.

Qualities of an interpreter

Interpreters must have strong concentration skills, an excellent memory, a pleasant voice, perfect elocution and physical and mental strength. They must also be tactful and flexible. Interpreting requires attention to detail, perceptiveness, well-roundedness and extensive general knowledge.

Conference interpreters must be ready to travel, as their work often requires them to leave the country.

Working conditions

Just like translators and terminologists, interpreters can be divided into two categories: salaried and private practice. Salaried interpreters are recruited in teams of varying numbers depending on the context. They work in insulated booths with a direct view of the speakers.

 

Private practice interpreters have irregular workloads, with slow and peak periods. For this reason, clients must request their services as far in advance as possible.

Court interpreters generally work alone. During long proceedings, two interpreters share the task, switching out at regular intervals. For foreign language interpreters, the interpreting may take place outside of court. The interpreters accompany lawyers, investigators or other official representatives during face-to-face meetings with defendants or witnesses, either in private, at the office of the probation officer or elsewhere.

 

For expert testimonies, the interpreters will ask to see a copy of the witness report in advance in order to conduct the necessary terminological research and obtain clarifications.

Court interpreters are independent contractors with irregular and often unpredictable schedules as proceedings are subject to judicial demands, which can change without notice based on developments in the proceedings.

Training

Currently, no Quebec university offers a program specialized solely in interpreting. However, both simultaneous and consecutive interpreting are taught in various universities and specialized schools around the world. The Order studies each candidate’s file and may recognize these studies as equivalent.

 

In Canada, conference interpreting is taught at the master’s level at the University of Ottawa’s School of Translation and Interpretation.

Certified interpreter: a reserved title

Only OTTIAQ members in good standing may practise under the title of certified interpreter in Quebec. Certified interpreters have qualifications recognized by the Order and are therefore professionals.

For more information on the responsibilities of OTTIAQ members, refer to the General public section.

OTTIAQ awards the titles of certified translator, certified terminologist and certified interpreter and attests to the qualification and professionalism of the individuals bearing these titles. This is one of the ways in which the Order fulfills its mandate to protect the public. Consult our online directory to find OTTIAQ members who provide the services you require.

President

Donald Barabé

Certified Translator

Purpose, mission, vision

Purpose

OTTIAQ protects the public by issuing the professional titles of certified translator, certified terminologist and certified interpreter

It ensures compliance with its Code of ethics and professional standards, and implements the other mechanisms set out in the Professional Code.

Mission

OTTIAQ promotes the recognition of its titles through its prominence and influence on the local, national and international stages.

 

Our members help build recognition for their qualifications through their professionalism and by displaying their titles.

Vision

Position ourselves as a reference in translation, terminology and interpreting.

Provide a community and professional development hub for practitioners in these fields.

The Order's values

Responsibility

Responsibility means commiting to holding ourselves accountable for our actions, respecting ethics and standards of professional conduct, and protecting the public.

Professionalism

Professionalism means ensuring skill and quality in our professions and our interactions. It requires diligence, efficiency and proactivity as well as creativity, ongoing development and a high level of autonomy.

Leadership

Leadership means being able to guide, influence and inspire others. It requires a vision and a strategy, confidence in our abilities, and communication and persuasion skills.

Landmark dates in the Order's history

The Order 11
The Société des traducteurs de Montréal (STM) is established.
The Order 5
The STM changes its name to the Société des traducteurs du Québec (STQ).
The Order 4
The STQ absorbs the members of the Cercle des traducteurs and the Corporation des traducteurs professionnels du Québec. This was to ensure the preservation of the founding objectives of the three associations, namely to provide members with information and professional development and advance and raise the visibility of the profession.
CPTIAQ
The Société des traducteurs du Québec becomes the Corporation professionnelle des traducteurs et interprètes agréés du Québec (CPTIAQ).
The Order 3
The Corporation changes its name to the Ordre des traducteurs et interprètes agréés du Québec (OTIAQ) in compliance with the Loi modifiant le Code des professions et d'autres lois professionnelles.
The Order 2
On July 12, OTIAQ officially becomes the Ordre des traducteurs, terminologues et interprètes agréés du Québec (OTTIAQ) after receiving approval from the National Assembly of Québec to add the title of terminologist to its name. This makes the Order the largest association of language professionals in Canada.
The Order 7
The Order submits a brief to the Office des professions du Québec (OPQ) seeking to eliminate the qualifier “certified” from its titles, gain recognition for each of the three types of interpreting and reserve the certification of official documents for members of the Order. The OPQ refuses the first request and asks the Order to conduct research.
The Order 12
OTTIAQ becomes a member of the International Federation of Translators (FIT).
The Order 7
The Order submits a second brief to the Office des professions du Québec requesting the modernization of the scopes of practice of the three professions and the reservation of professional translation activities. The requests are still under review.
The Order 8
OTTIAQ goes all out to celebrate its 25th anniversary. All events this year revolve around the occasion, and on April 12, there is a commemoration of the issue of its letters patent at the National Assembly of Québec followed by a cocktail reception at restaurant Le Parlementaire.